Host Plant and Non-plant Specialists -- Acorns to Hemlocks


The main reason the lepidoptera, and most particularly the moths, have become so numerous and diverse as species, is that they have found so many ways for their larvae to exploit the world of plants and to divide that world into specialized uses of plant parts. Some moth specialize in munching foliage from without and within (leafminers). Others live mainly as borers within the stems or stalks of low-growing plants or in the trunks of trees. Still others exploit root systems, fruits, buds, cones, seeds and other plant parts. A much smaller group of moths make their livings in other ways, developing through the use of lichens, fungi, beehives, animal fur and even the stored products of man.

In my yard and garden I can discover at least one species of moth that utilizes almost every plant that I can identify including my lawn grasses and weeds, every ornamental shrub, perennial and annual flowering plant and vine, and vegetable raised for our own consumption. There have also been a few species that are occasionally found in our kitchen and pantry and in the produce brought home from the supermarket. All in all it is really no surprise to have so far found more than 700 species of adult moths in my yard. Many of them are shown in the listing that follows below.
 

Acorns
Ailanthus
Apple
Apple
Valentina glandulella
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Atteva punctella
Richard Leung - VA
 
Cydia pomonella
Nolie Schneider - ON
 
Sphinx gordius
John Himmelman - CT
 
Azalea
Basswood
Beeswax
Beet
Caloptilia azaleella
Richard Leung - VA
 
Olethreutes tiliana
Janice Stiefel - WI
 
Gelleria mellonella
Anthony W. Thomas - NB
 
Hymenia perspectalis
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Birch
Birch
Blackberry
Bougainvillea
Eriocrania semipurpella
Anthony W. Thomas - NB
 
Acronicta betulae
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Chlorchlamys chloroleucaria
Alan Chin-Lee - FL
 
Asciodes gordialis
Machele White - FL
 
Boxwood
Bunchberry
Burdock
Cabbage
Galasa nigrinodis
Machele White - FL
 
Olethreutes connectus
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Papaipema cataphracta
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Evergestis pallidata
Nolie Schneider - ON
 
Catalpa
Celery
Chickweed
Chinquapin
Ceratomia catalpae
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Udea rubigalis
John Davis - WA
 
Haematopis grataria
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Dyseriocrania griseocapitella
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Citrus
Clothing
Clover
Clover
Gonodonta nutrix
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Tinea pallescentella
Ben Smart - UK
 
Plathypena scabra
Matthew Roth - PA
 
Hypsopygia costalis
Anthony W. Thomas - NB
 
Columbine
Corn
Corn
Cotton
Papaipema leucostigma
Dave Beadle - ON
 
Ostrinia nubilialis
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Helicoverpa zea
Lynette Schimming - NC
 
Crocidosema plebejana
Machele White - FL
 
Currant
Dead Wood
Dogwood
Douglas Fir
Synanthedon tipuliformis
Shane Farrell - UK
 
Scolecocampa liburna
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Euthyatira pudens
Bob Duncan - NY
 
Orgyia pseudotsugata
John Davis - WA
 
Eggplant
Elder
Elm
Euonymus - Spindle
Lineodes integra
Charles Lewallen - OK
 
Achatodes zeae
Forest Barnas - MN
 
Ceratomia amyntor
Patrick Coin - NC
 
Yponomeuta cagnagella
Carroll Rudy - WI
 
Evergreens
Fern
Fig
Filbert
Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Callopistria mollissima
John Himmelman - CT
 
Xanthopastis timais
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Cydia latiferreana
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Finned-willow
Fireweed
Fringe-tree
Fungus
Notodonta scitipennis
Cindy Mead - MI
 
Mompha conturbatella
Ben Smart - UK
 
Adita chionanthi
Nolie Schneider - ON
 
Metalectra quadrisignata
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Gaillardia
Goldenrod
Goosefoot
Gorse
Schinia masoni
Charles Lewallen - OK
 
Schinia nundina
Tom Murray - MA
 
Chrysoesthia drurella
Nigel Whinney - UK
 
Agonopterix nervosa
John Davis - WA
 
Grape
Grasses
Grasses
Hemlock
Desmia funeralis
Machele White - FL
 
Acrolophus plumifrontella
Robert Patterson - MD
 
Rivula propinqualis
Bev Wigney - ON
 
Nepytia phantasmaria
John Davis - WA
 






MothTalk/MothTalk016.htm -- 01/15/2007